Long and Slow Apples

1.11.2013



I started out to make this with little interest really, as the title is no eye catcher. But it was our recipe for today´s FFWD group, so that´s what I was making.
As I read the recipe and started to set out the ingredients, it dawned on my that it was the apple `loaf´ I ate many times in the past, courtesy of one of my father´s ex wives (yes, one of them, there are a few...). 
This is an interesting recipe, where very few ingredients bake a long time transforming themselves into something that you don´t expect. Just apples, butter and sugar basically, forgotten in a low heat oven and turning into a silky, caramelized dessert. And I really mean forgotten because it´s best to leave it overnight, and I really mean low oven, as in 100ºC /220ºF.


Long and slow apples is not a fitting title for a recipe that even this guy considers genius. You might mistakenly turn the page, not even tempted by a photograph because there is none. I definitely need to have a serious talk with Dorie about this.
You start with apples, cut them very thin, mandoline thin, and then stack them up in a buttered mold, alternating layers of fruit with brushes of melted butter and sprinklings of sugar and a flavoring like a zest or cinnamon. Cover the whole thing and forget about it in the oven.
I used a loaf pan and baked it for like 7 hours, until I got a golden color and the apples were absolutely tender when pierced with a knife. 


It´s a bit like packing a suitcase, you start with a base and then fill the nooks and crannies with those irregular little pieces of apples until it looks like not another single thin slice fits in, yet a little pressure down makes room for a few more. The first time you might realize you needed more sugar between layers or a different spice, so next time you get a bit better at it. 
And, just like packing, after a few times you can perfectly fit all your slices and the amount of sugar is perfect, the result is amazing and you do it in no time.


I have eaten this dessert many times in the past and was even given the recipe at some point, though I will hardly ever know where it is now. What I do remember is that it involved orange juice too, that was poured through the sides before popping it into the oven, and the final color was a much deeper caramel brown. It was richer in every way. So I need to try it and let you know.

You can find the recipe here. And the rest of the group´s attempts at it here.






46 comments:

  1. Looks great, one big dessert!

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  2. I LOVE your loaf version!! Very pretty, Paula!!!

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  3. wow this looks impressive and delicious!

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  4. I'm glad to see someone tried for the LONG and SLOW version of this. It looks amazing. P.S. My dad has several ex-wives too. :)

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  5. You´re right, it´s not a catchy title, but your description sounds lovely! I saw somewhere this type of preparation, a 9 hour cooking apple, or something similar, and I was´t excited to leave something in the oven for that long. But a two hour baking dessert is not that bad. I have to try this!

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  6. Wow, I just love the looks of this apple loaf-can only image how delicious it was;-)

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  7. Very clever! I love the idea and will borrow it next time:) Mary renamed this recipe Pommes Confites á la Dorie!

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  8. Wow, that's a very cool technique and recipe. I've never even stopped to read this recipe in Dorie's book *shame face* probably for the very reasons you listed in this post. You can't go wrong with apples, butter, and sugar-cinnamon. This must've been absolutely silky and melt-in-the-mouth. PS. your dad just has a lot of love to give! ;)

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  9. Very impressive, Paula! I really love the loaf version…luscious looking! I must give it a try!
    Have a great weekend!

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  10. I love the idea of this recipe, and I will be making it next week for guests coming to dinner. Do you think it will work for pears? Thanks for another recipe that I know will become a staple. ~ David

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    1. It´s a bit spooky how we think the same things sometimes... I was thinking about pears this morning while uploading this post. I´ll try and let you know!

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    2. Hi again, so I am definitely going to make this for Friday's supper with friends (with apples) and I really like your loaf idea versus the ramekins from the LA Times. So my question for you is, did you use a regular bread loaf pan? Did you just use 4 apples like the recipe said, or did you double everything? Also, did they all compress a lot while cooking?

      Yes, definitely pears next time. I think that could be amazing...

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    3. I used a medium (7,5x3,5 inch) loaf pan, only 3 apples and the pan was full, and, after covering it with foil I weighed it down with another loaf pan filled with 1 inch of water. They do shrink a lot, probably by half. But you can mound the apples much more than I did, and use the 4 apples. Also, if you serve this with cream you don´t need large portions. I would estimate 4 servings from the one I made.

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    4. This was amazing! I ended up using the ramekins as I didn't have the medium-sized loaf pan. Actually, I used coffee cups! I weighted the apples under the parchment and foil, and that worked fine. I love that they aren't too sweet, and I served them with a small dollop of vanilla ice cream. The coriander and ginger were perfect with this, too. Thanks for the introduction to a great recipe! ~ David

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  11. Love your loaf idea my friend it looks so elegant :)

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  12. Such an interesting recipe. I love the way it looks finished after slow cooking/baking. They layers are just so neat. Simple and yet really eye catching to me.

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  13. What a clever idea my friend these apples look so elegant :)

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  14. While I'd much rather hear about your father's many wives, I think we need to save that for another day. And, yes, when you come to the States, I agree, we need to see Dorie about page 390-391 of the cookbook. New name for the recipe. More clearly written directions. And, a PICTURE. I really, really, really like how you pulled this week's recipe off, Paula. A loaf. Brilliant. If I make it again (and, I probably won't), I have just the pan. Unlike you, I thought the whole apple slicing idea was very time consuming. I used a mandoline and only filled three ramekins. It took a long time but I am no whiz with a mandoline. I did wake up this morning when all my fingers intact so I am happy about that. I wish you had tried the orange juice. That sounds as if it would work and pump up the wonderful flavors even more. Nice job, Paula.

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  15. Some recipes are such fun to discover! I find that to be one of the joys of cooking! It looks scrumptious!

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  16. The dessert looks beautiful and delicious:) Great job!

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  17. Yep, we definitely owe Dorie some feedback for the 2nd edition of this book.

    But, I love that you made a loaf! You are so creative and this would be so impressive to bring to the table and slice.

    Have a great weekend!

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  18. I loved the combo of apples, orange, and cinnamon. I think I would like to try long and slow in the slow cooker. I like the loaf idea. And topped with ice cream would be perfect.

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  19. What great apple slices! Your dish turned out fantastic!

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  20. How interesting. I have never seen anything like this! But as long as it's apples I like it:)

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  21. I wish I made a loaf! I've been using the apples to top my oatmeal and I wish I made more!
    I really like the structure the loaf pan has given your apples. Very nice :)

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  22. LOVELY Paula!!!! And yes we all agree - we need to give some serious feedback for the 2nd edition of the book for this recipe. It deserves a better title, a photo and better directions (sans plastic wrap!)

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  23. Love this apple loaf!! When you find the other recipe I would definitely be interested in giving it a try. Yum!

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  24. The loaf is an incredibly genius way to serve this. Yep - this recipe definitely needs a better name :-)

    Have a great weekend.

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  25. I love this "cake", healthy and delicious and pretty! I think my dad would love it even more: he always looks for cakes with more fruits than batter. I will send him the recipe, and will probably make it for him myself one day. Thank you for sharing and have a beautiful weekend!

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  26. It's true that the name is hardly catchy, and t is not a beauty to look at, but agreed that it is also delicious. Who knew that so few ingredients could produce such a lovely dessert?

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  27. I love your blog because I always get to read about these wonderful desserts I've never tried. This sounds like my kind of dessert - three main ingredients! This looks beautiful Paula!

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  28. this looks simply mouthwatering, a really fabulous idea.
    mary x

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  29. Paula, this is amazing!!! I never have seen this before, but now I'm dying to try it! Wishing you a beautiful weekend!

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  30. Paula, that is and amazing recipe! I can taste all those melting apples ... Thanks for visiting my blog! :)

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  31. I seriously love this recipe, but I do adore apples:-) I like how you put them in a loaf pan, they look so pretty! Beautiful, Hugs, Terra

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  32. Great post! I love that you made it in a loaf shape. I agree with the quibble about the name, but I think it was to make it sound a little more homey. Mary's name for it is much catchier, I think!

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  33. Great idea Paula! And I totally agree with you change the title of this recipe pronto!!! It is too good to be lost by misunderstanding :) As for the pictures well I believe a picture IS 1000 words so I have clipped your photograph of the apples and tapped it onto the book's page for future reference :)

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  34. I have never seen anything remotely like this but it looks amazing! I love how simple it is. I bet the texture and flavor are both something special. Sometimes the simplest ingredients make something wonderful.

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  35. love that you made a l-o-n-g and slow apple :)

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  36. I am so impressed that you were familiar with this and even have a way to tweak it with orange juice- sounds very interesting to get some added flavor and color. I am still on the fence about the amount of cutting and having the oven on required to knock this out again, but rest assured if I do make it ......I will be doing the loaf just like yours !! And as usual, your photos are stunning. Well done !!

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  37. What a great presentation. I like the idea of using a loaf pan for this.

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  38. Paula, this is so beautiful - I love the elegant presentation that you made, I had read about it but never before seen a picture and I really think this is much smarter than the ramekin version. It is a lot of work preparing all the ramekins when you have to feed a crowd every day (like I do). I will definitely make this again and definitely follow your instructions in the post and the comment section! Thanks for posting this!
    Sorry, I am so late with my comments...we are so unbelievably busy these days...I will follow up with my "missing comments" on the weekend!

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  39. This looks so amazing! I'll have to keep this one in mind for next fall when we pick apples.

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  40. That is lovely! I thought that is a cake but on closer look, it is made of apples!

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